Gloucester’s High Cross, by Liz Jack

Image

Gloucester's High Cross, as shown in the 1455 Gloucester rental

Gloucester’s High Cross, as shown in the 1455 Gloucester rental

Every year, on New Year’s Eve, Gloucester residents gather at ‘The Cross’ to celebrate the coming of the New Year.  The vast majority of them believe that The Cross is so-named because it is where the four ‘Gate’ streets meet in the middle of the city.  Not so!  It is named after the original stone memorial cross that stood at the junction for hundreds of years.

Continue reading

Uncovering the past: the finds

Last time we looked at the archaeological digs that took place at Alvin Street, and this post is going to look more closely at the items they unearthed.

In total around 160 finds were recovered from the three trenches, including lots of pottery, fragments of clay pipes, worked bone, metal artefacts, building materials and over 7kgs of animal bones!

There is an old saying in the county ‘Scratch Gloucestershire – find Rome’ and the excavations certainly reinforced this point. Continue reading

Uncovering the past

If you’ve been following our recent blog posts you’ll know that we’ve been exploring the history of our site, just off Alvin Street in Gloucester, as part of the “For the Record” project.

We’ve looked at documents about this building’s history as Kingsholm School, at maps showing the plant nursery that was on this site in the 1850s, and at a map of Gloucester’s civil war defences showing this area.  What we didn’t know much about was the site’s earlier history, which is where the archaeologists came in!  Continue reading

‘The Howse that was so fayre’

This is the story of ‘The Howse that was so fayre’, investigated by Chipping Campden History Society over the past eighteen months. In 2013 Gloucestershire Local History Association’s annual Local History Afternoon carried the theme of ‘Gloucestershire’s Special Houses’. There was an obvious one for us, Campden House. Continue reading