Blogging a Building (5)

 

So, what’s been happening this week? Well, our builders have removed the giant slab that formed the base of the Horsa Hut they demolished last week.  The excavator swapped its careful claw for a pummelling pecker and broke it into tiny pieces.  Result!  You can see, but not hear (unlike those of us working onsite!), this for yourself from the images below – also by clicking on this video link: https://youtu.be/Y6hKgdm3s90

These works are all part of the groundworks needed to prepare the way for the three new specialist storage rooms (‘strongrooms’ in archives-speak) that are going to be built onto the back of our main building. They also involved an unexpected rescue operation: saving and re-homing a displaced hedgehog, now safe in our Archives Support Officer, Jenny’s garden and enjoying the company of other prickly friends.

Hedgehog 20170323

Recently rescued hedgehog happily snoozing

Back inside, the inner entrance door to the old Archives reception has been removed and the builders are ready to knock down some walls to create the new Heritage Hub spaces. They’ll be able to get on with this as soon as they have the necessary propping design (another new term for my construction vocabulary).  I’m discovering there’s a lot more to this building malarkey than meets the eye!

 

JS ID photo 2016

Jill Shonk

Access & Learning Leader

Blogging a Building (3)

Earlier this week I happened to glance through the window of one of our decommissioned office spaces. And I saw the strangest sight: a blue polythene tunnel leading to the door of one of our outbuildings and, just outside it, a weird looking being, not unlike an astronaut.

“What’s going on?” I wondered. “Are we hosting Sci-Fi productions as a new income generation scheme?  Or maybe I’ve missed headline news about a zombie apocalypse in Gloucester?”

Thankfully, the aliens hadn’t landed and there was a simple explanation for the tunnel and the man in coveralls – asbestos removal. This work is taking place in both our main building and the Horsa huts opposite the old overflow parking area.  It is an essential part of our building programme and is being carried out by experts.  Once it’s been completed, it will allow our builders to push on with the removal of internal walls (to create new Heritage Hub spaces) and demolish the Horsa huts (to provide a new onsite access route).  All being well, we should see some of this action next week.  Meantime, “Live long and prosper”!

These photos show the controls needed to remove asbestos from a floor duct. The route is sealed to prevent the escape of fibres.  Workers take a shower in the mobile unit after they have taken off their overalls and masks, which they put into sealed plastic bags.

Heritage Hub partners feature at Police Open Day

The Open Day at police headquarters is always a great opportunity to showcase Gloucestershire’s amazing police heritage.  This year’s event, on Saturday 17 September,  was the best one yet with over five and a half thousand visitors coming through the gates.

The Police Archive Group, Gloucestershire Archives and Gloucestershire Family History Society were all brought together in the “history zone”, with complementary displays and expertise.   Everyone was kept very busy with people finding out what will be on offer in the new Heritage Hub as well as seeing what’s available in the police archives. There were lots of enquiries about police ancestors and the team of police volunteers will be following up many of over the coming weeks.

register-of-rural-constabulary

We made sure to take along the register of rural Constabulary- a star item from the official police archives.  It’s packed with information about the earliest recruits to the new Force in 1839, and the neat copper plate handwriting is a source of wonder to children of the digital age.

girl-and-the-register

And there’s still interesting material at large in the community – we had promises of photographs and memories from ex officers and from people who had suitcases, belonging to ex members of the constabulary, in their attics. There were also some tentative enquiries from people not connected to the police who were interested in joining the archive group. It was also great to hear that many people were already aware of the police archive website that went live just a couple of weeks ago.

All in all, a very productive day.

Co-authored by Sue Webb, police archive officer, and Kate Maisey, Gloucestershire Archive development officer.

Police archive website – www.gloucestershirepolicearchives.org.uk

Lucky 13 for Gloucestershire history

Founded in 1899, the Victoria County History (so named because of its dedication to Queen Victoria) aspires to create a scholarly history of every parish in every County in England.  It is organised on a County basis and the first Gloucestershire volume was published in 1907.  There was then a gap in production until the 1960s, but volumes have since been produced on a regular basis.

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Who’s been digging holes at Alvin Street?

This week we’ve had specialist site investigators on site,  making trial pits and bore holes around the main Archives building.  Thankfully, most of the work was outdoors.  But we couldn’t avoid the hole in the visitor coffee lounge – sorry!

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These geological investigations will tell us about the engineering and environmental characteristics of the areas we plan to develop or build on.  And our project architects will use this information to fine tune decisions about building design, including the sorts of foundations we’re going to need for the new strongrooms and Heritage Hub spaces, which is pretty exciting!

We appreciate it has been a bit noisy this week but the work is paving the way for project dreams to become a reality, so please bear with us.

We will be able to announce a start date soon – so watch this space!

In other news…

Gloucester History Festival 2016Don’t forget there are still lots of events going on in the city for Gloucester History Festival. Visit http://gloucesterhistoryfestival.co.uk/ or see our blog post from last week for more details.

Heritage Open Days (8-11 Sept)

The city is proud to take part in the national Heritage Open Days’ Scheme. The Open Days encourage people to discover the wonderful diversity of our local heritage and in Gloucester members of the public have the opportunity to go behind doors and gates that are normally closed to the public; some of the city’s real gems are hidden from the first-time visitor. The Open Days give people an opportunity to discover and explore the wonders of the city. Many volunteers lead guided tours of the city and buildings, often in traditional costume and make history come alive. Find out more at https://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/visiting and search for Gloucester.

 

Coming soon to an Archives near you

Did you know that the Archives’ site is used for purposes other than just caring for and making available the County’s historic documents? For instance, the Gloucester branch of Gloucestershire Family History Society holds their meetings here once a month, currently in the Frith Centre.  Anyone is welcome to attend, although a small charge is made for refreshments, and you can find a list of the upcoming events at http://gfhs.org.uk/events-2/action_agenda/cat_ids~29/. Continue reading

Gloucester History (and Retro) Festivals; Gloucestershire Archives recommends….

Gloucester History Festival 2016The following sessions are being run by colleagues, volunteers or researchers connected with the Archives.  Full details for most events are available in the History Festival booklet – available on-line or in hard copy from Gloucestershire Archives.

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