Lucky 13 for Gloucestershire history

Founded in 1899, the Victoria County History (so named because of its dedication to Queen Victoria) aspires to create a scholarly history of every parish in every County in England.  It is organised on a County basis and the first Gloucestershire volume was published in 1907.  There was then a gap in production until the 1960s, but volumes have since been produced on a regular basis.

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Coming soon to an Archives near you

Did you know that the Archives’ site is used for purposes other than just caring for and making available the County’s historic documents? For instance, the Gloucester branch of Gloucestershire Family History Society holds their meetings here once a month, currently in the Frith Centre.  Anyone is welcome to attend, although a small charge is made for refreshments, and you can find a list of the upcoming events at http://gfhs.org.uk/events-2/action_agenda/cat_ids~29/. Continue reading

Gloucester History (and Retro) Festivals; Gloucestershire Archives recommends….

Gloucester History Festival 2016The following sessions are being run by colleagues, volunteers or researchers connected with the Archives.  Full details for most events are available in the History Festival booklet – available on-line or in hard copy from Gloucestershire Archives.

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Working together

In our last post we shared news about the next stage of “For the Record” and the creation of Gloucestershire Heritage Hub.  We also explained the development work will bring changes to Gloucestershire Archives’ services and facilities.

While the physical changes to the Alvin Street site are certainly significant, they’re not our only focus.  Alongside the building work, we’re also launching our extensive programme of activities that offer learning, participation, training and volunteering opportunities. Continue reading

Preservation and Interpretation – A trainees perspective

Since August 2013 I have been working at Gloucestershire Archives as a trainee archivist; and in September I moved to Liverpool to study for my Masters in Archives and Records Management, the professional qualification which will allow me to work as an archivist in the future. Continue reading

Records aren’t always made of vinyl

The title of this post may seem obvious to anyone with a long-standing interest in archives, history or heritage, but not everyone comes from this kind of background. If you’d asked me, two years ago, to describe a record I would probably have imagined my parents’ 33rpm albums or the few Top-40 singles I bought just before cassette tapes became widely available. If I thought about it really seriously I might have muttered something about hospital notes.

But what has this got to do with Gloucestershire Archives? Well, two things really.

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